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Public Notices:

How to Generate Energy from Trash

Did you know that the stuff nobody seems to want can be used to produce electricity, heat or fuels?
We use the term "biomass" whenever we change garbage (eg., farm waste or plant materials) into energy. This can be done in three different ways:
By burning biomass to produce heat and electricity
By changing biomass to a gas-like fuel such as methane
By changing biomass to a liquid fuel (these are also called "biofuels" and include two forms of alcohol: methanol and ethanol)
Because biomass can be changed directly into a liquid fuel, it could someday supply much of our transportation fuel needs for cars, trucks, buses and airplanes.
Garbage can also be used as an inexpensive energy resource for creating electricity. Unlike most other energy resources, someone will collect garbage, deliver it to the power plant and pay to get rid of it. This helps cover the cost of turning the garbage into energy.
The Tynes Bay Incinerator burns more than 60,000 metric tons of waste per year and produces 3,800 kW (kilowatt=1,000 watts) or 3.8 MW (megawatt=1,000,000 watts) of power-the equivalent of one of BELCO's gas turbine engines. The heat from the burning garbage is used to produce steam and turn turbines which are connected to a generator. Of the 3.8 MW of power generated, Tynes Bay uses 1.2-1.3 MW for its own operation; the remaining 2.5 MW is sold to BELCO and used throughout the Island. One disturbing note is that the amount of waste being burnt by Tynes Bay is increasing at a rate of approximately 8% per year, as we produce more and more waste materials.
It is important to remember that municipal solid wastes can produce air pollution when they are burned and turned into energy. Certain products such as batteries and fluorescent light bulbs should never be included with regular garbage because, when they are burnt, they give off toxic fumes that are harmful to people.
Did you know that the stuff nobody seems to want can be used to produce electricity, heat or fuels?

We use the term "biomass" whenever we change garbage (eg., farm waste or plant materials) into energy. This can be done in three different ways:

  • By burning biomass to produce heat and electricity
  • By changing biomass to a gas-like fuel such as methane
  • By changing biomass to a liquid fuel (these are also called "biofuels" and include two forms of alcohol: methanol and ethanol)

Because biomass can be changed directly into a liquid fuel, it could someday supply much of our transportation fuel needs for cars, trucks, buses and airplanes.

Garbage can also be used as an inexpensive energy resource for creating electricity. Unlike most other energy resources, someone will collect garbage, deliver it to the power plant and pay to get rid of it. This helps cover the cost of turning the garbage into energy.

The Tynes Bay Incinerator burns more than 60,000 metric tons of waste per year and produces 3,800 kW (kilowatt=1,000 watts) or 3.8 MW (megawatt=1,000,000 watts) of power-the equivalent of one of BELCO's gas turbine engines. The heat from the burning garbage is used to produce steam and turn turbines which are connected to a generator. Of the 3.8 MW of power generated, Tynes Bay uses 1.2-1.3 MW for its own operation; the remaining 2.5 MW is sold to BELCO and used throughout the Island. One disturbing note is that the amount of waste being burnt by Tynes Bay is increasing at a rate of approximately 8% per year, as we produce more and more waste materials.

It is important to remember that municipal solid wastes can produce air pollution when they are burned and turned into energy. Certain products such as batteries and fluorescent light bulbs should never be included with regular garbage because, when they are burnt, they give off toxic fumes that are harmful to people.

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