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How is Electricity Generated?

Electricity flows through wires to light lamps and run TVs, computers and all other electrical appliances. But where does the electricity come from?
The simplest form of an electrical generator consists of a strong magnet, a rotating copper coil and a power source to spin the coil. The power source can be either a motor or a turbine. The spinning rotator coil continually interrupts the lines of force of the magnetic field, producing electrical current.
Most power plants in larger countries are big boilers that burn a fuel to make heat. That heat energy is used to boil water to make steam. The steam is fed under high pressure to a turbine. The turbine spins and a shaft is connected to a turbo generator that changes the mechanical spinning energy into electricity.
However, in Bermuda we produce electricity directly through large engines which use fuel oil or diesel to make them work. These engines are directly connected to a generator and do not rely on steam to spin the generator shaft. These engines are the same as the engines in a car or motorbike. The only difference is that they are much larger and instead of being connected to a transmission to turn the wheels of the car or bike, the spinning shaft is connected to a generator.
The generator has a giant magnet at the end of the spinning shaft. It spins inside a stationary ring wrapped with a long wire. As the magnet turns, an electric current is produced in the wire. When a wire or any electrically conductive material moves across a magnetic field, an electric current is produced in that wire.
A generator is just like a "reverse" electric motor. Instead of using electrical energy to spin the motor and wheels, like in an electric toy car, the shaft from the engines spins the motor and electricity is produced.
The electricity then goes to transmission wires that link our power plant to the homes, schools and businesses in Bermuda.

Electricity flows through wires to light lamps and run TVs, computers and all other electrical appliances. But where does the electricity come from?

The simplest form of an electrical generator consists of a strong magnet, a rotating copper coil and a power source to spin the coil. The power source can be either a motor or a turbine. The spinning rotator coil continually interrupts the lines of force of the magnetic field, producing electrical current.

Most power plants in larger countries are big boilers that burn a fuel to make heat. That heat energy is used to boil water to make steam. The steam is fed under high pressure to a turbine. The turbine spins and a shaft is connected to a turbo generator that changes the mechanical spinning energy into electricity.

However, in Bermuda we produce electricity directly through large engines which use fuel oil or diesel to make them work. These engines are directly connected to a generator and do not rely on steam to spin the generator shaft. These engines are the same as the engines in a car or motorbike. The only difference is that they are much larger and instead of being connected to a transmission to turn the wheels of the car or bike, the spinning shaft is connected to a generator.

The generator has a giant magnet at the end of the spinning shaft. It spins inside a stationary ring wrapped with a long wire. As the magnet turns, an electric current is produced in the wire. When a wire or any electrically conductive material moves across a magnetic field, an electric current is produced in that wire.

A generator is just like a "reverse" electric motor. Instead of using electrical energy to spin the motor and wheels, like in an electric toy car, the shaft from the engines spins the motor and electricity is produced.

The electricity then goes to transmission wires that link our power plant to the homes, schools and businesses in Bermuda.

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