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Heat energy

Heat is a form of energy. We use it for things like cooking our food and warming our water for showers.
Heat energy moves in three ways:
Conduction: Conduction is when energy is passed directly from one item to another. If you stirred a pot of soup on the stove with a metal spoon, the spoon would heat up. The heat is being conducted from the hot area of the soup to the colder area of spoon.
Metals are excellent conductors of heat energy. Other things like wood or plastics are not good conductors of heat energy. These "bad" conductors are called insulators. That's why a pot is usually made of metal and the handle is made of a strong plastic. This way, the pot heats up and the handle remains cool.
Convection: Convection is the movement of gases or liquids from a cooler spot to a warmer spot. In a pot of soup the warmer soup moves up from the heated area at the bottom of the pot to the top where it is cooler. The cooler soup then moves to take the warmer soup's place. The movement is in a circular pattern within the pan.
Winds are often caused by convection currents. During the day, cool air from over the ocean moves to replace the rising warm air over land. At night, the directions change because the water is warmer and the land is cooler.
Radiation: Radiation is the final form of movement of heat energy. The sun's light and heat cannot reach us by conduction or convection because space is almost completely empty. There is nothing to transfer the energy from the sun to the earth. The sun's rays travel in straight lines called heat rays. This movement is called radiation.
When the sunlight hits the earth, some of its radiation is absorbed and some is reflected. Darker surfaces absorb more of the radiation and lighter surfaces reflect the radiation. So, if you wear light or white clothes outside during the summer, you'll be cooler.

Heat is a form of energy. We use it for things like cooking our food and warming our water for showers.
Heat energy moves in three ways:


Conduction: Conduction is when energy is passed directly from one item to another. If you stirred a pot of soup on the stove with a metal spoon, the spoon would heat up. The heat is being conducted from the hot area of the soup to the colder area of spoon.
Metals are excellent conductors of heat energy. Other things like wood or plastics are not good conductors of heat energy. These "bad" conductors are called insulators. That's why a pot is usually made of metal and the handle is made of a strong plastic. This way, the pot heats up and the handle remains cool.


Convection: Convection is the movement of gases or liquids from a cooler spot to a warmer spot. In a pot of soup the warmer soup moves up from the heated area at the bottom of the pot to the top where it is cooler. The cooler soup then moves to take the warmer soup's place. The movement is in a circular pattern within the pan.


Winds are often caused by convection currents. During the day, cool air from over the ocean moves to replace the rising warm air over land. At night, the directions change because the water is warmer and the land is cooler.

Radiation: Radiation is the final form of movement of heat energy. The sun's light and heat cannot reach us by conduction or convection because space is almost completely empty. There is nothing to transfer the energy from the sun to the earth. The sun's rays travel in straight lines called heat rays. This movement is called radiation.

When the sunlight hits the earth, some of its radiation is absorbed and some is reflected. Darker surfaces absorb more of the radiation and lighter surfaces reflect the radiation. So, if you wear light or white clothes outside during the summer, you'll be cooler.

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