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Public Notices:

Glossary

Biomass energy: Changing farming wastes, grasses, trees, bark, sawdust and other things into energy by burning it, changing it to a gas or converting it to a liquid fuel.
Coal: A solid fossil fuel found in the earth. Coal is burned to make electricity in other countries.
Clean Air Act: A law to regulate air quality.
Compact fluorescent lights: Lights that use a lot less energy than regular light bulbs. We can use compact fluorescent lights for reading lights and ceiling lights.
Distribution vaults: A room used to house the equipment used to distribute electricity.
Emission: Susbtance(s) given out from a device or plant.
Energy: Energy is the ability to do work. Stored energy becomes working energy when we use it.
Energy crops: Crops grown specifically for their fuel value, including food crops such as corn and sugarcane, and non-food crops such as poplar trees and switchgrass.
Environment: All the natural and living things around us. The earth, air, weather, plants and animals all make up our environment.
Exchange Control: Regulations, introduced by the monetary authorities of governments to control the flow of money.
Fossil fuels: Energy sources formed by the decay of plants, dinosaurs and other animals over millions of years; coal, oil and natural gas are fossil fuels.
Fuel: Any material that can be burned to make energy.
Geothermal energy: Using the heat from the earth to produce power.
Hydropower: Using the energy in flowing water to make electricity.
Kilowatt (kW): 1000 watts, the watt is a unit of power.
Municipal solid waste: Trash or garbage used to produce energy by burning it or by capturing the gases it gives off and using them as fuel.
Natural gas: A fossil fuel found deep in the earth. Natural gas is often found with oil.
Nonrenewable fuels: Fuels that cannot be easily made or "renewed." We can use up nonrenewable fuels. Oil, natural gas and coal are nonrenewable fuels.
Nuclear energy: Energy that comes from splitting atoms of radioactive materials, such as uranium, which leave behind radioactive wastes.
Oil: A liquid fuel found deep in the earth. Gasoline and some plastics are made from oil.
Passive solar heater: A solar water-heating or space-heating system that moves heated air or water without using pumps or fans.
Photovoltaic energy: A type of solar energy that converts sunshine into electricity.
Propane gas: A fuel produced from oil or natural gas. Propane gas is used for barbecues, water heaters, stoves and heaters.
Radioactive waste: Materials left over from making nuclear energy. Radioactive waste can harm people and the environment if it is not stored safely.
Recycling: A way to reuse materials instead of just throwing them away.
Recycle mark: A design of three arrows that make up a circle. This mark tells you that you can recycle the product. It can also mean that the item is made from recycled materials.
Renewable energy: Types of energy that are "renewed" as we use them; solar, wind and geothermal energy are forms of renewable energy.
Renewable fuels: Fuels that can be easily made or "renewed." We can never use up renewable fuels. Types of renewable fuels are solar, wind and hydropower energy.
Single phase: Electricity distributed using two main conductors.
Substation: A building where the flow of electricity is controlled by switches.
Solar energy: Energy from the sun. The heat that builds up in your car when it is parked in the sun is an example of solar energy.
Solar heating: Using the sun's energy to heat our homes and water.
Sunspace: A room that faces south, or a small structure attached to the south side of a house.
Three phase: Electricity transmitted and distributed using three main conductors.
Transformers: Devices for converting electricity from one voltage to another.
Wind power: Using the wind to produce electricity by turning blades on a wind turbine.

Biomass energy: Changing farming wastes, grasses, trees, bark, sawdust and other things into energy by burning it, changing it to a gas or converting it to a liquid fuel.

Clean Air Act: A law to regulate air quality.

Coal: A solid fossil fuel found in the earth. Coal is burned to make electricity in other countries.

Compact fluorescent lights: Lights that use a lot less energy than regular light bulbs. We can use compact fluorescent lights for reading lights and ceiling lights.

Conventional generating sets – mechanical engines that run on fossil fuel and the equipment related to the engines

Corporate social responsibility – a concept whereby an organisation considers the interests of society by taking responsibility for the impact of its activities and operations on customers, employees, shareholders, the community and the environment

Distributed generation – generating electricity from energy sources located away from the central power plant

Distribution vaults: A room used to house the equipment used to distribute electricity.

Emission: Susbtance(s) given out from a device or plant.

Energy: Energy is the ability to do work. Stored energy becomes working energy when we use it.

Energy delivery system – all of the overhead and underground transmission & distribution lines, substations, vaults, switchrooms and associated equipment used to deliver electricity to Bermuda safely, reliably, securely and sustainably

Energy delivery system – all of the overhead and underground transmission & distribution lines, substations, vaults, switchrooms and associated equipment used to deliver electricity to Bermuda safely, reliably, securely and sustainably

Energy crops: Crops grown specifically for their fuel value, including food crops such as corn and sugarcane, and non-food crops such as poplar trees and switchgrass.

Environment: All the natural and living things around us. The earth, air, weather, plants and animals all make up our environment.

Environmental impact – positive and/or negative influence on the environment.

Exchange Control: Regulations, introduced by the monetary authorities of governments to control the flow of money.

Fossil fuels: Energy sources formed by the decay of plants, dinosaurs and other animals over millions of years; coal, oil and natural gas are fossil fuels.

Fuel: Any material that can be burned to make energy.

Geothermal energy: Using the heat from the earth to produce power.

Hydropower: Using the energy in flowing water to make electricity.

Kilowatt (kW): 1000 watts, the watt is a unit of power.

Large-scale renewable energy technology includes offshore wind turbines and ocean current generating systems.

Municipal solid waste: Trash or garbage used to produce energy by burning it or by capturing the gases it gives off and using them as fuel.

Natural gas: A fossil fuel found deep in the earth. Natural gas is often found with oil.

Nonrenewable fuels: Fuels that cannot be easily made or "renewed." We can use up nonrenewable fuels. Oil, natural gas and coal are nonrenewable fuels.

Nuclear energy: Energy that comes from splitting atoms of radioactive materials, such as uranium, which leave behind radioactive wastes.

Oil: A liquid fuel found deep in the earth. Gasoline and some plastics are made from oil.

Passive solar heater: A solar water-heating or space-heating system that moves heated air or water without using pumps or fans.

Photovoltaic energy: A type of solar energy that converts sunshine into electricity.

Propane gas: A fuel produced from oil or natural gas. Propane gas is used for barbecues, water heaters, stoves and heaters.

Radioactive waste: Materials left over from making nuclear energy. Radioactive waste can harm people and the environment if it is not stored safely.

Renewable energy - effectively uses natural resources, such as sunlight, wind, rain, tides, ocean current and geothermal heat, which are naturally replenished.

Recycling: A way to reuse materials instead of just throwing them away.

Recycle mark: A design of three arrows that make up a circle. This mark tells you that you can recycle the product. It can also mean that the item is made from recycled materials.

Renewable energy: Types of energy that are "renewed" as we use them; solar, wind and geothermal energy are forms of renewable energy.

Renewable fuels: Fuels that can be easily made or "renewed." We can never use up renewable fuels. Types of renewable fuels are solar, wind and hydropower energy.

Single phase: Electricity distributed using two main conductors.

Small-scale and micro renewable technologies are those that can be used by homes and businesses to generate power, including photovotaic and solar thermal panels

Solar energy: Energy from the sun. The heat that builds up in your car when it is parked in the sun is an example of solar energy.

Solar heating: Using the sun's energy to heat our homes and water.

Substation: A building where the flow of electricity is controlled by switches.

Sunspace: A room that faces south, or a small structure attached to the south side of a house.

Three phase: Electricity transmitted and distributed using three main conductors.

Transformers: Devices for converting electricity from one voltage to another.

Wind power: Using the wind to produce electricity by turning blades on a wind turbine.

StreetLight Reporting

Three ways to report:

Use our interactive map

Email streetlights@belco.bm

  • Phone 955

Tree Trimming Requests

For tree trimming related service interruption requests:

Read BELCO's Tree Trimming Policy.

BELCO Service Rules

BELCO Certifications

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